Tag: Lexington Virginia

“I live in language on land they left”

Some troll tweeted at me the other day that since I seem not to like Lexington, Virginia, I should just leave. He styled himself as a lover of the Shire who’s not ashamed of being a hobbit. He even used Elijah Wood as Frodo… Continue Reading ““I live in language on land they left””

Not fleeing

When I was eleven, I started to plot my escape. Financial independence seemed like the prerequisite, but the 50 cents an hour I earned babysitting weren’t going to take me far. So, baby steps. I started by purchasing my own shampoo and toothpaste, keeping… Continue Reading “Not fleeing”

Extinction burst?

Last Monday, I found a KKK recruitment flier on my front lawn. Just a week or so earlier and a few blocks away, the first physical memorial to enslaved African-Americans was installed at Washington and Lee University, an institution that benefited financially from slavery… Continue Reading “Extinction burst?”

Pain, pleasure, and Spottswood Styles

Ghosts of poetry: once, on the current site of Washington and Lee University’s theater, there stood a brick house with a stone fireplace “so large that we could burn whole railroad ties without having them cut.” It belonged to Spottswood Styles, 1869-1946, “Lexington’s Negro… Continue Reading “Pain, pleasure, and Spottswood Styles”

Murray Robertson (photography & poems)

I make photographs and poems to please myself (and share them to please you).

barleybooks

pages from an unbound book

The Friday Influence

a poetry blog & online home to the work of José Angel Araguz

Kitty Marie's Reading Corner

book blogger & reviewer

Rusted Honey

Poetry, haiku, tanka, and micropoetry

(armedwithcoffee)

poetry, writer's lift wednesday, music, and other stuff

Alizabeth Worley

Art. Disability. Writing.

Tara K. Shepersky

Place, Poems, Practice

Matthew Paul

Poetry and what-not

The Daily Compost

(because compost happens)

Madeline Ruth Walker

The work wants to be made

Colleen Anderson

Writing from both sides of the brain

Mary Carroll-Hackett: Poetry and Prose

"This work is unlike any other, in its range of rich, conjuring imagery and its dexterity, its smart voice. Carroll-Hackett doesn’t spare us—but doesn’t save us—she draws a blueprint of power and class with her unflinching pivot: matter-of-fact and tender." —Jan Beatty

NZ Poetry Shelf

a poetry page with reviews, interviews and other things