Category: Shenandoah

Future schmuture

No NEH grant again, a magazine acceptance, a solicitation of poems from a magazine I’d never cracked (!), several poem rejections, some drafting and revising, lots of Shenandoah work, a vague but persistent headache, short days and blustery cold–hello from a mixed-blessing November in… Continue Reading “Future schmuture”

Imagining poetry after the election

Inside Out September, 2016     Shouldn’t talk with a mouthful of half-chewed flags, but he smirks and suggests her Secret Service guys disarm and see what happens. The crowd turns wild and you can spot a star wedged in his molar. Scraps of… Continue Reading “Imagining poetry after the election”

It is not upon you alone the dark patches fall

…The dark threw its patches down upon me also, Walt Whitman wrote in “Crossing Brooklyn Ferry.” Nearly as often as he reflects on his own tingling senses, Whitman, it turns out, writes about distance and solitude, sometimes expressing pain about it and reaching for… Continue Reading “It is not upon you alone the dark patches fall”

Looking off cliffs

I’m not processing very well, here at the quiet edge of apocalypse. Sometimes I’m fine, scared, down, or stir-crazy; often I’m busy teaching remotely, being fortunate enough to still have a job; generally I can’t concentrate. New York City has always been the center… Continue Reading “Looking off cliffs”

Virtual Salon #4 with Elizabeth Hazen

We’ve been called so many things that we are not, we startle at the sound of our own names. -Elizabeth Hazen, from “Devices” I’ll be teaching a virtual Whitman and Dickinson course in our May term, and because it may be pass/ fail only,… Continue Reading “Virtual Salon #4 with Elizabeth Hazen”

Virtual launches and figuring out how to help

When my students asked me last week–during our final in-person classes, as it turns out–how I thought the virus would develop or whether W&L would switch to online instruction soon, I offered guesses with the caveat, “But I’m not an authority on this. My… Continue Reading “Virtual launches and figuring out how to help”

Not resolutions but invocations

Last year, I substituted a mantra for a resolution: “breathe.” It helped a little. This New Year’s Eve I wrote up more resolutions, got upset about them, and then decided: to hell with self-improvement. I need fewer bullet points on my endlessly guilty, mildly… Continue Reading “Not resolutions but invocations”

Screening Shenandoah submissions

It’s the last week of classes! I’m participating in what will be a brilliant reading at 4:30 today (in Hillel on W&L’s campus), from the beautiful Literary Field Guide to Southern Appalachia! And can I say it again?–this intense term is nearly DONE! In… Continue Reading “Screening Shenandoah submissions”

Uncanny paneling

When you write a poem that resembles a spell, prayer, charm, curse, or blessing, are you trying to make something happen, and if so, what or how? That’s what we talked about on the Uncanny Activisms panel I organized for the C.D. Wright Women… Continue Reading “Uncanny paneling”

Copy-editing and fact-checking poems

As the New York Times reports, we’re seeing industry-wide hand-wringing right now about how rarely books are fact-checked, following scandals involving Naomi Wolff and others. I’m proud that Shenandoah editor Beth Staples makes fact-checking a priority: the interns comb through every piece we publish,… Continue Reading “Copy-editing and fact-checking poems”

Murray Robertson (photography & poems)

I make photographs and poems to please myself (and share them to please you).

barleybooks

pages from an unbound book

The Friday Influence

a poetry blog & online home to the work of José Angel Araguz

Kitty Marie's Reading Corner

book blogger & reviewer

Rusted Honey

Poetry, haiku, tanka, and micropoetry

(armedwithcoffee)

poetry, writer's lift wednesday, music, and other stuff

Alizabeth Worley

Art. Disability. Writing.

Tara K. Shepersky

Place, Poems, Practice

Matthew Paul

Poetry and what-not

The Daily Compost

(because compost happens)

Madeline Ruth Walker

The work wants to be made

Colleen Anderson

Writing from both sides of the brain

Mary Carroll-Hackett: Poetry and Prose

"This work is unlike any other, in its range of rich, conjuring imagery and its dexterity, its smart voice. Carroll-Hackett doesn’t spare us—but doesn’t save us—she draws a blueprint of power and class with her unflinching pivot: matter-of-fact and tender." —Jan Beatty

NZ Poetry Shelf

a poetry page with reviews, interviews and other things